Abstracts at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR)

I had some time while waiting for a connecting flight at Newark Liberty International Airport last Saturday and noticed this interesting play of reflections and silhouettes while ‘dining’ in the largest of the Terminal C food courts (the selection is actually pretty good).

Instead of heading over to the Continental lounge I decided to do some photography instead. These were passengers arriving on international flights making the fairly long walk to US customs and immigration. I think it worked fairly well, though I must admit I felt a bit awkward standing in the same spot for about 45 minutes waiting for international flight arrivals and taking seemingly random photos (for those travelers around me who may have been wondering what I was doing).

At one point I thought I was being shadowed, but it turned out the guy was just waiting for a flight to Miami. It pretty much reinforces my past experiences at other US airports that once through security, the chances of being hassled for taking photos in the terminal are fairly low. At least it hasn’t happened to me yet, though I was once briefly asked what I was doing in Toronto’s new Terminal One… but that’s Toronto.

Anyway, what you see in the photos is a corridor just after a 90 degree or more left turn and the reflections of people along the bottom are of those about a minute behind those along the top. Because it’s a reflection, they appear to be traveling in the other direction to the figures above, which is part of what I found interesting. What didn’t work out so well during the time I spent waiting and watching was that about 90% took the moving walkways rather than walk close to the glass. Had more walked closer to the glass I would have gotten what I feel would have been more figures above the reflections, resulting in a more interesting combination of shapes and silhouettes with two levels/layers of figures.

It will be something I keep in mind for future travels through EWR…

McMaster campus photowalk

McMaster University campus

Taking advantage of a streak of good weather, I went for a photowalk around the McMaster University campus late in the afternoon a few days ago, camera in hand. The campus has a nice mix of buildings and there is always something to photograph.

Below is a selection, primarily details of University Hall. I liked how the setting sun was gently skimming over the edges of the stonework and vines at the front of the building. Other images are from Divinity College and the starkly contrasting 1970s modernist Life Sciences Building.

There are more on my Flickr page here.

McMaster University campus
McMaster University’s first building, built in 1930 when McMaster relocated to Hamilton from Toronto – University Hall as seen from the south end of University Avenue. The lead image at top is a detail of a gargoyle in the arch at the base of the tower.

McMaster University campus
A grotesque at the main entrance.

McMaster University campus
Another grotesque, one of many representing various fields of study carved into the arch of the main entrance.

McMaster University campus
Looking up the main entrance arch.

McMaster University campus
University Hall was built in the Collegiate Gothic style found on many university campuses. The image above shows the stonework over the main entrance arch, including the shield which forms part of the school’s coat of arms. In the shield, the eagle is symbolic of heavenly vision, being able supposedly to gaze directly into the blazing mid-day sun. The cross on its breast “identifies this vision as Christian in inspiration” referring to the university’s Christian origin. The open book is a common symbol of learning, and the maple leaves signify that McMaster’s Charter was granted by the Province of Ontario. At the base of the shield are the roman numerals MCMXXX, 1930, the date the building was constructed.

McMaster University campus
Detail of the stonework and vines over the front entrance arch.

McMaster University campus
The north side of University Hall is heavily overgrown with vines. This is one of the less frequently used backdoors that accesses Convocation Hall. Please note that the door has been retouched to remove an ugly no smoking sign.

McMaster University campus

McMaster University campus
Divinity College

McMaster University campus

McMaster University campus
Details of the Life Sciences Building, built in 1972 in stark modernist contrast to earlier buildings on campus, part of the interest in McMaster’s buildings.

Taiwan Preview 5 – Taichung

OK, it’s not really shots representative of Taichung, but I found some interesting images around the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts. I was somewhat surprised to find this kind of architecture and design in Taiwan, being something I would more or less expect to see in Europe or the Americas. But just like this kind of architecture and design in other parts of the world, it really excited my photographic senses. Unfortunately I got to the museum late in the day and didn’t go inside, but spent a couple hours hanging out on the grounds creating my own art.